Raigad Fort




Region:Konkan
Height:1400
Base Village:Pachad

Raigad was Shivaji’s capital, the hill fort where he was crowned (1674 AD) and where he died (1680 AD).  Strategically situated on an irregular wedge-shaped mass of rock, detached from the main body of Sahyadri Mountains by a deep valley and inaccessible from three sides, Raigad is 210kms south of Mumbai and 27kms north of Mahad.  The fort’s 5.12sq.kms hill-top plateau has three main points Hirakani in the west, Takamak in the north and Bhavani in the east.  There is only one pathway to Raigad, probably in keeping with Shiviaji’s strategy “the fort’s approach should be easy for friends and impossible for foes”.  A motorable road leads to Chit Darwaja, about 2kms from Pachad, the village at the base, where lies the Samadhi of Jijabai, Shivaji’s mother.  A long climb from Pachad takes one to the Mahadarwaza, flanked by two massive bastions and a high curtain wall.

The top plateau is covered with a large number of remains of buildings and reservoirs.  Behind the Ganga Sagar reservoir are two high towers, in Muslim style.  Behind the towers is the Balekilla or citadel, entered by the Palakhi-darwaza.  On way to the right are remains of chambers of women of Royal families and on the left those of the Darbar of Shivaji.  On a low mound in the centre is the site of Shivaji’s throne.  Further north is the two-row market place, the Jagadishwar temple in an enclosure and the Samadhi of shivaji, and also that of his favourite dog, Waghya.

The history of Raigad, earlier known as Rairi, is obscure.  In the 12th century Rairi was a seat of the Shirke-Palegar family.  After changing several hands, it was captured by Shivaji from Chandrarao More in 1656 AD.  Shivaji chose Rairi for his capital and renamed it as Raigad.  The gigantic construction work was entrusted to Abaji Sondeve and Hiroji Indulkar.  In its heyday Raigad had more than 300 houses, and structures.  After Shivaji, the fort remained in the hands of Sambhaji till 1689 AD, when it was captured by the Mughals.  Reverted to the Marathas in 1735 AD, Raigad was surrendered to the British in 1818 AD.

For its immense beauty, Raigad remains a hiker's paradise. The formidable Pratapgad fort with its equestrian statue of Shivaji is an interesting excursion.

You can also visit Gangasagar Lake or worship at the nearby Jagadishwar Temple or pay your respects to the great Maratha warrior at his Samadhi.

For Trekking :
There are many interesting routes to Raigad, varying from the relatively easy to the challenging. The path starts from Pachad, 24 kms from Mahad, a shallow sea port on the banks of the Savitri River. Raigad can also be an adventure-filled day excursion from the hill station of Mahabaleshwar or from Pune.

Getting there
By Air : Nearest airport is Pune 126 kms.
By Rail : Nearest railhead is Pune.
By Road : Mumbai-Raigad 210 kms. via Mahad. Pune-Raigad 126 kms. Mahad-Raigad 27 kms.

State Transport buses ply from Mumbai, Kolhapur and Pune to Ratnagiri and also from Ratnagiri to Pawas via Bhat

back

No comments: